Supply Chain Jams: Florida Ports Council Urges Shipping Companies To Avoid California – WPLG Local 10

To help with supply chain jams, the Florida Ports Council is asking shipping companies to avoid the snarls in California, use the Panama Canal and come to the Sunshine State.To help with supply chain jams, the Florida Ports Council is asking shipping companies to avoid the snarls in California, use the Panama Canal and come to the Sunshine State.MIAMI – To help with supply chain jams, the Florida Ports Council is asking shipping companies to avoid the snarls in California, use the Panama Canal and come to the Sunshine State.

President Joe Biden said Wednesday the Port of Los Angeles will move to 24/7 service as the Port of Long Beach already has and FedEx and UPS will increase overnight operations.

US Coast Guard Cmdr. Stephen Bor said cargo ships are back up along the shore and it looks like “a cell phone waiting lot” in the Pacific Ocean.

“There are more ships than there are parking spots,” Bor said.

A beach goer sits on the beach in Seal Beach Calif., Friday, Oct. 1, 2021, as container ships waiting to dock at the Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach are seen in the distance. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong) (Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved)Mike Rubin, the Florida Ports Council’s president and chief executive officer, said the 7-day Panama Canal voyage to Florida will help shipping companies avoid moorage fees to anchor ships. Jonathan Daniels, the chief executive and director of Port Everglades, likes the idea.

Megan Greene, a global chief economist and senior fellow at the Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business and Government at Harvard Kennedy School, said the supply problems started with China factory shutdowns.

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Containers are placed at a port in Yokohama, south of Tokyo, on Sept. 7, 2021. Japans exports rose 26% in August from a year earlier, preliminary data released Thursday, Sept. 16, 2021 showed, below analysts forecasts, as supply chain disruptions hit manufacturers. (AP Photo/Koji Sasahara) (Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.) “On the U.S. side, the issue is much more with labor, so a shortage of longshore workers and truckers to actually get stuff off shipping containers and into stores, onto shelves,” Greene said.

As countries start to reopen the economy and demand is surging, firms haven’t been able to keep up, according to Greene. Shipping costs increasing and a truck drivers’ shortage can cause higher prices.

“It all goes back to the pandemic. The pandemic has disrupted all markets,” said Mark Zandi, Moody’s Analytics chief economist.

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About the Author:Liane MorejonLiane Morejon is an Emmy-winning reporter who joined the Local 10 News family in January 2010. Born and raised in Coral Gables, Liane has a unique perspective on covering news in her own backyard.